The Holiday Workout

Most of us when on Holiday completely switch off from exercise. If you don’t want to miss out on training try some of these workouts.

This blog follows on from The Office Workout I published a few months ago. There are times we neglect exercise, most commonly in the Office and when taking time off, going on holiday.

The usual story is you’ve been training hard all year and then go on vacation. At home you’re a finely tuned machine with a strict routine. In holiday mode, that routine usually goes out the window. Now try not to fear, a week away from the gym will not cause significant losses in muscle mass or fitness.

But if you’re feeling fidgety and can’t just lie in the sun, I’ve put together some options. Also try making some up yourself, get creative with the movements you use in the gym.

Take a rope…

One of the easiest pieces of equipment you can take away. It’s small and light to carry. Work on singles or doubles. Develop your technique and surprise your training buddies when you get back.

75DU’s – 50 air squats – 25 burpees – 20 push ups – 25 burpees – 50 air squats – 75DU’s

Other DU options….

30 HSPU/Push ups – 40 Mountain limbers – 50 Sit ups – 60 Squats – 70DU’s

3 rounds: 20 DU’s – 30 Walking Lunges – 40 Push ups – 30 Squats – 20 V-sit ups – 10 Burpees

Use the ocean…

Unless you’re a CrossFit Games athlete, how often are you doing interval training with swimming?  Find a quite section of beach and jump in the water.

8 Rounds: 100m swim – 10 Push ups – 15 Sit ups

Other swimming options…

30 mins AMRAP 50m Swim – 10 Push ups – 15 Air squats

15 mins AMRAP 50m Swim – 30 seconds treading – 50m Swim 

Use the Beach…

The sand creates another challenge of instability that you don’t have in the gym. Train in the sand to make the workout harder.

5 Rounds: 10 Push ups – 15 Air squats – 50 Walking lunges – 10 Burpees

21 – 15 – 9 Push ups and Air squats – 400m run each round

15m Bear Crawl – 20 Push ups – 15m Crab Walk – 20 Squats – 15m Burpees broad jumps – 20 Mountain Climbers

Get Creative

Think of other possible ways of training on holiday. They might not always work but it’s worth trying.

Best Drinks for Hydration

Keeping hydrated is important to maintain a healthy functioning body. This study examines different fluids to find the most effective hydrator.

Maughan 2016

Staying hydrated is important to us all. Following an intense workout or long run a high volume of water will have been lost through sweat. Keeping well hydrated has been shown in studies to help with brain function, recovering from injury, muscle growth, improving sleep and mental health.

What’s your go to drink to keep hydrated?

There was a study published in 2016 by Ron Maughan, investigated the beverage hydration index. Fluids that are consumed need to be retained. If you’re drinking a big glass of water but the peeing the same volume out, this is not effective hydration.

Maughan was looking at several different fluids, using water as the base to compare the other drinks from. Following the consumption of fluid, urine was measured over 2 hours and then compared with the volume consumed. There were some obvious results like coffee having a poor hydration index. Some surprising results with milk being one of the better fluids retained, results close to expensive electrolyte drinks. It is thought that the milk content slows down the absorption of water, which results in less fluid extracted by the kidneys.

Important to consider when trying to rehydrate. Other than just drinking water consider putting in some lemon or a small amount of sea salt (the potassium and sodium help slow down the water absorption). This was the first study of its kind. Hopefully there’ll be future studies about post exercise related hydration drinks.

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Original Abstract

BACKGROUND: The identification of beverages that promote longer-term fluid retention and maintenance of fluid balance is of real clinical and practical benefit in situations in which free access to fluids is limited or when frequent breaks for urination are not desirable. The postingestion diuretic response is likely to be influenced by several beverage characteristics, including the volume ingested, energy density, electrolyte content, and the presence of diuretic agents.

OBJECTIVE:This study investigated the effects of 13 different commonly consumed drinks on urine output and fluid balance when ingested in a euhydrated state, with a view to establishing a beverage hydration index (BHI), i.e., the volume of urine produced after drinking expressed relative to a standard treatment (still water) for each beverage.

DESIGN: Each subject (n = 72, euhydrated and fasted male subjects) ingested 1 L still water or 1 of 3 other commercially available beverages over a period of 30 min. Urine output was then collected for the subsequent 4 h. The BHI was corrected for the water content of drinks and was calculated as the amount of water retained at 2 h after ingestion relative to that observed after the ingestion of still water.

RESULTS: Total urine masses (mean ± SD) over 4 h were smaller than the still-water control (1337 ± 330 g) after an oral rehydration solution (ORS) (1038 ± 333 g, P < 0.001), full-fat milk (1052 ± 267 g, P < 0.001), and skimmed milk (1049 ± 334 g, P < 0.001). Cumulative urine output at 4 h after ingestion of cola, diet cola, hot tea, iced tea, coffee, lager, orange juice, sparkling water, and a sports drink were not different from the response to water ingestion. The mean BHI at 2 h was 1.54 ± 0.74 for the ORS, 1.50 ± 0.58 for full-fat milk, and 1.58 ± 0.60 for skimmed milk.

CONCLUSIONS: BHI may be a useful measure to identify the short-term hydration potential of different beverages when ingested in a euhydrated state.

Maughan et al, (2016) A randomized trial to assess the potential of different beverages to
affect hydration status: development of a beverage hydration index. Am J Clin Nutr

What’s wrong with my knee?

Knee injuries are very common during sport and at work. For a faster recovery see your Dr or Physio to understand what structure you have damaged and how to rehab the injury effectively.

A knee sprain managed correctly will allow the tissue to heal fast and strong. Getting you back into what you enjoy most.

The knee is one of the most common joints injured in the body. A joint that absorbs a huge amount of force when running, jumping and lifting. Fortunately the femur and tibia are surrounded by many structures, but it’s usually these supporting structures that take the stress when we have an injury.

What could I have damaged?

Ligaments: About 40% of injuries to the knee involve ligaments either by a sprain or tear. These structures help give extra stability to the knee. When it has been put under excessive tension it damages the fibers. This results in pain, swelling and instability.Ligament injury knee

Patellofemoral: 24% of injuries are involving the knee cap. The patella sits within a small channel and if not guided correctly from surrounding muscles and ligaments pain can develop. This becomes particularly sore when squating, running and even basic functions like climbing stairs and sitting.Patella dysfunction

Meniscus:  11% involve the meniscus. It is fibrocartilage that sits within the knee, providing a level of stability to the ligaments and an element of shock absorption when weight bearing. This can cause a lot of swelling, pain and restrictions. In some cases the knee may lock in certain positions.

Knee injury meniscus

Other Injuries: The remaining 25% consists of fractures to knee, dislocation of the patella, Iliotibial band syndrome, hamstring and quads strains/tears etc.

What to do if I’ve injured my knee?

Firstly if you’ve just injured your knee and struggling with weight-bearing seek medical attention, where a Dr may consider an Xray, prescribe medication and will likely refer you to a physiotherapist. If the symptoms are not too severe, but you’re still concerned, come straight to physio. At Fundamental Physio Newmarket I can provide you with the following:

  • A detailed assessment of your knee using a range of tests to identify the structures involved, also looking at the mechanics of the hip and ankle.
  • Manual therapy to encourage normal movement and faster rate of healing.
  • A personalised exercise program for your identified weakness’. This may involve strength exercises, stretches and balance exercises.
  • Biomechanical assessment and correcting movement dysfunctions that may delay your recovery.
  • Providing you with an understanding of the structures affected and a treatment plan to meet your overall goals.
  • If recovery is slower than expected referrals can be made for Xrays/scans to sports or orthopaedic specialist.

Fundamental Physio Newmarket is supported by ACC. If you have hurt the knee during an accident, whether it was at home, work or on the sports field you will receive treatment cover for the injury.

For an appointment, call on 095290990 

CrossFit – How can Physio help?

CrossFit has its share of injuries like any sport. An experienced physio with knowledge of the training can get an athlete functioning pain free quickly and performing back to their best.

To perform at your best you need a strong mindset, great coaching staff that are strict with your technique and an experienced physio to prevent aches and pains

Most Kiwi’s are pretty tough, with a ‘she’ll be right” mentality when it comes to injury. You’d think that would be a perfect combination with the image CrossFit portrays. But when you’ve been carrying that niggle for so long and it starts getting worse, it could shut you down completely from training.

Physio and CrossFit work well together

Physio’s are specialists in movement analysis and CrossFit itself is a training regime that goes through gross fundamental movement patterns. So putting yourself through these movements and identifying your weakness’ gives me a lot more insight into where your problem could be coming from.

What are the common complaints?

There have been interesting studies done over the last few years into injuries within CrossFit. Interestingly the studies correlated similar with the same common areas being involved:

  • Shoulder
  • Lower back
  • Knee

Some injuries being severe enough to stop some from working, training and competing. These are the most common areas of injury I see come into the clinic from CrossFit, but I also see others suffering from:

  • Neck and thoracic strains
  • Ankle sprains and hypomobility
  • Hip impingement
  • Patella dysfunction from quad heavy squats
  • Wrist strains

How can Physiotherapy help?

As a physio it’s my job to get you functioning pain free as quickly as possible. Being a Crossfitter myself, who performs daily and understands the training styles, philosophy and terminology I can relate to the frustrations that you may face with limitations in training. Also working on site I can take you into the gym, look at techniques of different movements and provide you with additional drills to perform before your WOD.

What do I offer a CrossFit athlete?

  • An assessment of your movement patterns looking for weakness, asymmetry and any underlying mobility issues.
  • Hands on therapy for immediate pain relief, this may involve soft tissue massage, joint mobilisations and dry needling.
  • Localised taping of problem areas to assist you during your next training session
  • Diagnosis and ongoing management for acute or severe injuries, including referrals for further tests such as x-rays/ultrasounds, scans or to a specialist.
  • Educating you on what caused your injury or pain and steps to prevent further problems.
  • A personalised rehabilitation program – listing corrective, strengthening and stretching exercises to assist your recovery.
  • Liaising with and providing regular updates of your progress directly to your coach or trainer to ensure you get a coordinated approach to your rehabilitation. This also ensures that you are scaling or modifying WOD’s as required.

For an appointment, call on 095290990 

Montalvo et al (2017) Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine

Keogh et al (2016) The Epidemiology of Injuries Across the Weight-Training Sports. Sports Medicine

Weisenthal et al (2014) Injury rate and patterns among CrossFit athletes. Journal of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, and Knee Athroplasty

Myofascial Release

Myofascia interweaves through our muscles and takes up to 80% of muscle mass. Consider this when you’re doing your stretching and but not getting the results you wanted, it’s possibly due to fascial restrictions.

What is Myofascia?

Fascia is the largest system in the body with the appearance of spider’s web. Fascia is very densely woven from the top of the head to our toes, covering and interpenetrating every muscle, bone, nerve, artery and vein, all our internal organs including the heart, lungs, brain and spinal cord. In this way, you can begin to see that each part of the body is connected to every other part by the fascia, like a fitted suit.

How would it affect me?

Myofascia interweaves through our muscles and takes up to 80% of muscle mass. Consider this when you’re doing your stretching and but not getting the results you wanted, it’s possibly due to fascial restrictions.

I’d like you to try something. Reach behind your back with your right hand, grab a handful of the shirt/top in the middle of your back. Now try and lift your left hand above your head, it will likely be restricted and wind up in certain areas. Think about the tightness and restriction you might feel doing an overhead lift or in the back when squatting, it could be the fascia pulling on these areas.

One study has shown that tightness in the posterior neck muscles can cause a significant decrease in hamstring length and strength. (1)

What causes it to get tight?

Postural adaptations, trauma, inflammatory responses, and surgical procedures create myofascial restrictions that can produce tensile pressures of approximately 2,000 pounds per square inch on pain sensitive structures that do not show up in many of the standard tests (x-rays, MRI scans, etc.)

What does Myofascial release involve?

The MFR technique appears quite light as it puts a slow sustained shearing force on the superficial layer of fascia that lies beneath the skin. The superficial layer taps into other deeper structures within muscle and other systems of the body. There is no oil used as it allows for more feedback detecting for fascial restrictions into the therapist’s hands. There is extensive evidence that shows myofascial release is an effective tool in improving flexibility and reducing pain (2,3,4,5)

How does it differ from a deep tissue massage?

With DTM this is more directed to muscle tissue that has adhesions or is tightened and needs deep pressure to bring back some length and lower its tone. Although the deep pressure can be painful depending on how sensitive the tissue is and pain tolerances of the individual.

 

  1. McPartland et al (1996) Rectus capitis posterior minor: a small but important suboccipital muscle, Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
  2. Hsieh et al,  (2002) Effectiveness of four conservative treatments for subacute low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. Spine.
  3. Wong, K.-K. et al, (2016) Mechanical deformation of posterior thoracolumbar fascia after myofascial release in healthy men – a study of dynamic ultrasound. Physiotherapy
  4. LeBauer et al, (2008) The effect of myofascial release (MFR) on an adult with idiopathic scoliosis. J Bodyw Mov Ther.
  5. Ajimsha et al (2012) Effectiveness of myofascial release in the management of lateral epicondylitis in computer professionals. Arch. Phys. Med. Rehabi.
  6. Ajimsha, M.S. et al, (2014) Effectiveness of Myofascial release in the management of chronic low back pain in nursing professionals Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies