Disc Prolapses that Reabsorb

A recent study shown that re-absorption of disc prolapses is higher than previously thought.

Zhong 2017

The Concern and fear that the words “slipped disc” “disc bulge” or “degenerative disc disease” can be worse than the actual symptoms of pain. The image of being broken and not being able to recover. But as previously noted in another blog about MRI scans, a large number of the general public suffer with a disc prolapse without symptoms. They manage to carry out a normal fulfilled life.

This new study of pooled data from the UK and Japan showed a significantly high number of lumbar disc re-absorption. To be precise it was 66.6% (82.94% in the UK I might add!!). All patients received conservative treatment, there was no invasive treatments like surgery or steroid injections.

This goes to show that with patience in your recovery and the right guidance, spinal problems will resolve without being too hasty for surgery.

 

Original Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lumbar disc herniation (LDH), a common disease, is often treated conservatively, frequently resulting in spontaneous resorption of the herniated disc. The incidence of this phenomenon, however, remains unknown.

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence of spontaneous resorption after conservative treatment of LDH using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

STUDY DESIGN: Meta-analysis and systematic review of cohort studies.

SETTING: The work was performed at The Suzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

METHODS: We initiated a search for the period from January 1990 to December 2015 using PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Two independent reviewers examined the relevant reports. The references from these reports were also searched for additional trials using the criteria established in the PRISMA statement.

RESULTS: Our results represent the pooled results from 11 cohort studies. The overall incidence of spontaneous resorption after LDH was 66.66% (95% CI 51% – 69%). The incidence in the United Kingdom was 82.94% (95% CI 63.77% – 102.11%). The incidence in Japan was 62.58% (95% CI 55.71% – 69.46%).

LIMITATIONS: Our study was limited because there were few sources from which to extract data, either in abstracts or published studies. There were no randomized, controlled trials that met our criteria.

CONCLUSIONS: The phenomenon of LDH reabsorption is well recognized. Because its overall incidence is now 66.66% according to our results, conservative treatment may become the first choice of treatment for LDH. More large-scale, double-blinded, randomized, controlled trials are necessary to study the phenomenon of spontaneous resorption of LDH.

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Reference

Zhong et al, (2017) Incidence of Spontaneous Resorption of Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Meta-Analysis. Pain Physician

Back Pain Myth Busting Part 4

This series of blogs is to help bring some clarity with what to expect with back pain and what the evidence is telling us.

Next up are two biggies. How should I sit and can I lift with a spinal injury? Posture is an important factor with both positions but it’s understanding how it can be effective while recovering.

 

7 The perfect sitting posture may not exist

The body is designed to move. If we sustain a position for too long, we end up loading an area more than it’s designed for. This can either be in a slouched position or even sitting erect. It’s important to alternate our sitting positions to avoid pain and adaptations (1). This can be done with changing sitting positions, getting up regularly and doing tasks in standing that you would normally do sitting (i.e. taking phone calls). Try to change position every 20minutes.

Knowing that movement through range in sitting is necessary to gain confidence in your spine instead of being rigid/protective. (2)

 

8 Exercise and resistance training

Lower back pain can cause people to fear and avoid certain activities that involve bending, lifting and twisting (3). However, it is important that we encourage this within a safe environment, to gain confidence and reach better outcomes.

Initially it may be sore practising these movements, but as mentioned previously it’s about understanding the type of pain you feel. This will help strengthen the spine and supporting structures, getting you back to lifting, running and jumping.

Studies have shown great benefits and long-term safety of various types of exercises (4) including high load resistance training (5).

 

1.     Zemp et al, (2013) In vivo spinal posture during upright and reclined sitting in an office chair. BioMed Research International.

2.     Baumgartner et al, (2012) The spinal curvature of three different sitting positions analysed in an open MRI scanner. The Scientific World Journal.

3.     Thomas et al, (2008) The relationship between pain-related fear and lumbar flexion during natural recovery from low back pain. Eur Spine J.

4.     Steele et al (2015) A Review of the Clinical Value of Isolated Lumbar Extension Resistance Training for Chronic Low Back Pain; American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

5.     Pieber et al (2014) Long-term effects of an outpatient rehabilitation program in patients with chronic recurrent low back pain; Eur Spine J

Back Pain Myth Busting Part 3

This series of blogs is to help bring some clarity with what to expect with back pain and what the evidence is telling us.

You may have heard of the phrase, Pain doesn’t hurt. In some cases, it doesn’t. Also, the urgency for having spinal surgery may want to be reconsidered based on the research.

 

5 More pain does not mean more damage

As mentioned previously the spine is a complexed structure with many different factors effecting it from a physical, mental and environmental perspective. You could have two individuals with the same injury, but can feel different sensitivities of pain (1).

Our nervous system has an influence on the pain we feel and can sometimes get stuck in a loop if the injury is poorly managed. So, even once it has healed we can still experience discomfort.

Our coping strategies vary depending on different types of pain. Once we understand that some pains are not causing damage, our quality of life can be drastically improved. (2,3)

 

6 Surgery is rarely needed

There are only a small proportion of people with back pain that need surgery. Following clear guidance from your physio or Dr by staying active with exercise, manual therapy when needed, positive reinforcement of movement, understanding your injury and good pain management we see excellent results.

The statistics for successful outcomes following surgery vary from one country to another and between surgeons. But there is evidence showing that the outcomes after having surgery are similar to non-surgical treatments over a span of 1-2 years (4,5).

 

1.   Vernon H, (2010) Historical review and update on subluxation theories. J Chiropr Humanit.

2.   Taylor et al (2014) Incidence and risk factors for first-time incident low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis: The Spine Journal October

3.   George et al, (2012) Predictors of Occurrence and Severity of First Time Low Back Pain Episodes: Findings from a Military Inception Cohort. PLoS ONE 7(2): e30597

4.   Brox et al, (2010) Four-year follow-up of surgical versus non-surgical therapy for chronic low back pain Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

5.   Wynne-Jones et al, (2014) Absence from work and return to work in people with back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Occupational and environmental medicine