Lunge Hip Mobility

The 2nd part of hip mobility focuses on your lunge shape. Having full access to hip extension will improve your running, throwing and kicking abilities.

This is the second part of the hip series. These hip shapes are positions that we should all be striving for to have confidence and feel safe to function if exposed to complex positions. 

Following on from the blog hip opener for the hinge shape is our next hip position we should try to achieve. The lunge shape is full extension and internal rotation of the hip with the knee positioned behind the hip and foot pointing forwards. This shape is most seen in lifters doing split jerks, kicking a football, ball throwing. But most commonly seeing this lack of range with runners, not utilising the full hip extension in the push off at the end of stance phase.

Over the years adaptive changes happen either through injury or more with positions we adhere to. The most common being sitting, which results in anterior structures of the hip becoming limited. Lacking the end range of this movement could mean we’re selling our self short of momentum, power or endurance.

Running-lunge

Using the picture of long distance runner Mo Farah, he demonstrates a great lunge shape at the hip. While maintaining a neutral spine he manages to reach full hip extension and toes are pointed forwards, maintaining the internal rotation of the hip. Lacking hip extension can compromise running form of the upper limb and spine. But as you can see he reaches a good press shape of the opposite shoulder in the arm swing making his running style extremely efficient and balanced.

Below are a series of stretches and mobility exercises to help improve your lunge shape.

Couch stretch

If hip flexors are tight this is one of the best stretches for improving length back. A long sustained hold of this stretch with full diaphragmatic breathing over 2 minutes is extremely effective.

Illiopsoas Trigger Point Release

This muscle sits within the abdominal cavity and if tight it will feel sore with pressure through the abdominal wall towards the muscle. At first the pain can be quite high but relaxing into the pressure overtime the pain subsides and will feel looser once released. Aim for 1-2 minutes hold.

Hip flexor stretch (with band)

Another hip flexor stretch with a joint mobilisation using a band. Position the knee behind the hip. Allow the band to pull the hip forwards, contract the glutes to get the best anterior hip stretch.

Quads and inner thigh release with LaX ball

A lacrosse ball is a great tool for isolating sections of tight muscle. Rolling on the ball like you would a foam roller will be more effective, if tolerated. Then opening up inner thigh/hip adductors using the kettle bell handle. The knee flexion/extension stretches the muscle through range while being tacked down.

Suspended split stretch

This is for the more adventurous. It will help your lunge go deeper while increase stretch through the hamstrings. Throughout this movement, it is important to keep the glutes switched on to avoid hanging of the hip capsules. Spend around a minute each direction.

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Do your hips get the green Light?

Functionally the hip has certain positions that create stability and power. We should be looking at accessing its full range to ensure the health of the joint.

Healthy joints make difficult movements easier

Just like the shoulder, the hip has an important role in allowing us to function in various positions. It’s also a ball and socket joint, with both joints acting as catalysts for power, stability and accuracy of its connecting limb.

Unlike the shoulder as you may already know, the hip is held within a deeper socket, but still has a multitude of muscles surrounding the joint, including its own rotator cuff. The hip also has a ligamentous capsule with fibres angling in different directions. Using the capsule the joint can wind up into some very strong and stable positions. Accessing these ranges of tension puts the joint into a safe place to absorb load.

Gray339

These high torque shapes held by the hip are our start and finish points of most movements of the lower limb. Most of the time we can function well within the realms of the inner movement. But if we struggle to start from these positions it becomes difficult to transition and finish in a safe end shape. The goal should be to have full physiological capacity.

In the hip, there are 3 shapes we should all be able to achieve.


  1. The first movement is the squat/hinge a combination of flexion and external rotation at the hip. This movement takes all the glory, it’s all of our squat movements, it’s dead lifting, it’s rowing and the list goes on.
  1. Next is the Lunge/run which is full extension of the hip with internal rotation. This could be the bottom of a split Jerk, in running it would be your trailing leg before leaving the ground.
  1. Pistol is the last movement which alludes a lot of people (including myself), requiring full hip flexion but also full ankle dorsiflexion.

While the squat/hinge position is the most common hip shape used. We should also feel competent at the other 2 positions. Over the next few weeks I’ll go through the 3 movements and provide some ideas to achieve full depths.