CrossFit – How can Physio help?

CrossFit has its share of injuries like any sport. An experienced physio with knowledge of the training can get an athlete functioning pain free quickly and performing back to their best.

To perform at your best you need a strong mindset, great coaching staff that are strict with your technique and an experienced physio to prevent aches and pains

Most Kiwi’s are pretty tough, with a ‘she’ll be right” mentality when it comes to injury. You’d think that would be a perfect combination with the image CrossFit portrays. But when you’ve been carrying that niggle for so long and it starts getting worse, it could shut you down completely from training.

Physio and CrossFit work well together

Physio’s are specialists in movement analysis and CrossFit itself is a training regime that goes through gross fundamental movement patterns. So putting yourself through these movements and identifying your weakness’ gives me a lot more insight into where your problem could be coming from.

What are the common complaints?

There have been interesting studies done over the last few years into injuries within CrossFit. Interestingly the studies correlated similar with the same common areas being involved:

  • Shoulder
  • Lower back
  • Knee

Some injuries being severe enough to stop some from working, training and competing. These are the most common areas of injury I see come into the clinic from CrossFit, but I also see others suffering from:

  • Neck and thoracic strains
  • Ankle sprains and hypomobility
  • Hip impingement
  • Patella dysfunction from quad heavy squats
  • Wrist strains

How can Physiotherapy help?

As a physio it’s my job to get you functioning pain free as quickly as possible. Being a Crossfitter myself, who performs daily and understands the training styles, philosophy and terminology I can relate to the frustrations that you may face with limitations in training. Also working on site I can take you into the gym, look at techniques of different movements and provide you with additional drills to perform before your WOD.

What do I offer a CrossFit athlete?

  • An assessment of your movement patterns looking for weakness, asymmetry and any underlying mobility issues.
  • Hands on therapy for immediate pain relief, this may involve soft tissue massage, joint mobilisations and dry needling.
  • Localised taping of problem areas to assist you during your next training session
  • Diagnosis and ongoing management for acute or severe injuries, including referrals for further tests such as x-rays/ultrasounds, scans or to a specialist.
  • Educating you on what caused your injury or pain and steps to prevent further problems.
  • A personalised rehabilitation program – listing corrective, strengthening and stretching exercises to assist your recovery.
  • Liaising with and providing regular updates of your progress directly to your coach or trainer to ensure you get a coordinated approach to your rehabilitation. This also ensures that you are scaling or modifying WOD’s as required.

For an appointment, call on 095290990 

Montalvo et al (2017) Retrospective Injury Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Injury in CrossFit. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine

Keogh et al (2016) The Epidemiology of Injuries Across the Weight-Training Sports. Sports Medicine

Weisenthal et al (2014) Injury rate and patterns among CrossFit athletes. Journal of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, and Knee Athroplasty

Myofascial Release

Myofascia interweaves through our muscles and takes up to 80% of muscle mass. Consider this when you’re doing your stretching and but not getting the results you wanted, it’s possibly due to fascial restrictions.

What is Myofascia?

Fascia is the largest system in the body with the appearance of spider’s web. Fascia is very densely woven from the top of the head to our toes, covering and interpenetrating every muscle, bone, nerve, artery and vein, all our internal organs including the heart, lungs, brain and spinal cord. In this way, you can begin to see that each part of the body is connected to every other part by the fascia, like a fitted suit.

How would it affect me?

Myofascia interweaves through our muscles and takes up to 80% of muscle mass. Consider this when you’re doing your stretching and but not getting the results you wanted, it’s possibly due to fascial restrictions.

I’d like you to try something. Reach behind your back with your right hand, grab a handful of the shirt/top in the middle of your back. Now try and lift your left hand above your head, it will likely be restricted and wind up in certain areas. Think about the tightness and restriction you might feel doing an overhead lift or in the back when squatting, it could be the fascia pulling on these areas.

One study has shown that tightness in the posterior neck muscles can cause a significant decrease in hamstring length and strength. (1)

What causes it to get tight?

Postural adaptations, trauma, inflammatory responses, and surgical procedures create myofascial restrictions that can produce tensile pressures of approximately 2,000 pounds per square inch on pain sensitive structures that do not show up in many of the standard tests (x-rays, MRI scans, etc.)

What does Myofascial release involve?

The MFR technique appears quite light as it puts a slow sustained shearing force on the superficial layer of fascia that lies beneath the skin. The superficial layer taps into other deeper structures within muscle and other systems of the body. There is no oil used as it allows for more feedback detecting for fascial restrictions into the therapist’s hands. There is extensive evidence that shows myofascial release is an effective tool in improving flexibility and reducing pain (2,3,4,5)

How does it differ from a deep tissue massage?

With DTM this is more directed to muscle tissue that has adhesions or is tightened and needs deep pressure to bring back some length and lower its tone. Although the deep pressure can be painful depending on how sensitive the tissue is and pain tolerances of the individual.

 

  1. McPartland et al (1996) Rectus capitis posterior minor: a small but important suboccipital muscle, Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
  2. Hsieh et al,  (2002) Effectiveness of four conservative treatments for subacute low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. Spine.
  3. Wong, K.-K. et al, (2016) Mechanical deformation of posterior thoracolumbar fascia after myofascial release in healthy men – a study of dynamic ultrasound. Physiotherapy
  4. LeBauer et al, (2008) The effect of myofascial release (MFR) on an adult with idiopathic scoliosis. J Bodyw Mov Ther.
  5. Ajimsha et al (2012) Effectiveness of myofascial release in the management of lateral epicondylitis in computer professionals. Arch. Phys. Med. Rehabi.
  6. Ajimsha, M.S. et al, (2014) Effectiveness of Myofascial release in the management of chronic low back pain in nursing professionals Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies