Online Telehealth Appointments

What is telehealth physiotherapy? 

This is the delivery of health care information and services specific to you and your needs via electronic communication. That is management and treatment of your musculoskeletal, pain and pelvic health issues . 

 What are the benefits of telehealth physiotherapy? 

There are numerous benefits it can offer, that is
– Able to receive to expert physiotherapy advice and treatment in the comfort of your home,
– Provides convenience 
– Easy access to specialized services 
– Empower yourself and take control over your recovery  

Will I be covered under my insurance or ACC?

ACC has recently approved funding for patients to access physio via telehealth during the Covid-19 Lockdown to stop the spread. Most insurance companies have followed suit, but it may take just a phone call to clarify they include the service.  

 

Exercise prescription telehealth

Can anyone in the world access these services? 

No, this is only valid for people residing in New Zealand. 

Will my session be recorded?

No. This can be arranged on request. We will be using a secure online platform called physitrack that is encrypted. We ask that you download the app  via this link prior to the session on to your device (smartphone or tablet) or via this link if using a desktop computer.   

What equipment will I need?

All you need is a good internet connection and a webcam and a private quiet space. The physiitrack app will enable us to set up customized exercises with pictures, videos and instructions as well as educational materials and questionnaires as required. 

If you have any further questions contact on 096346469 or ONLINE BOOKING

Physio Auckland

Top 5 Posts of 2017

Entering the new year here’s a look back at last years 5 most popular blogs.

Happy New Year – 2018 is already under way. Hope you all had a great break.

Last year was a busy year with the blogs. Here are the top 5 posts from last year in case you missed them.

5. The Office WOD

  • How many of us at work get stuck in the same position and forget to move?
  • This post was offering some general strengthening and postural awareness exercises to follow regularly at work.
  • Try getting into a routine with these types of exercises. It should help prepare you better for training.

4. Trigger Points – what are they?

  • Those knots felt in your traps after a busy day at work are more than likely trigger points.
  • This blog goes into explaining what they are, how they’re caused and how they’re treated.

3. Recovering from DOMS

  • This was a popular topic as we all love a bit of DOMS.
  • Understanding how to manage your recovery and training while in the DOMS phase will make it more tolerable.
  • Also knowing the difference of pain between DOMS and an injury will help avoid making anything worse.

2. Improving front rack position

  • After doing many mobility assessments, the front rack shape is what most people struggled to hold passively without a bar.
  • This was one of a 4 part series of shoulder shapes we should be achieving to help make movement more efficient.
  • It offered a range of mobility exercises to open the shoulder into the front rack.

1. Anterior knee pain in CrossFit

  • One of the most common injuries in sports and top 3 with CrossFit athletes is a knee injury.
  • This blog looked at anterior knee pain and the common causes. It offers some basic suggestions to self managing the injury.

The purpose of these blogs has been to provide a wider understanding of your body and give you more control of it. Wishing you all an injury free 2018 and keep checking for the new blogs.

Hip Opener for Hinge Shapes

The hip hinge is an important movement in daily activities as well as in sports. Many people are unaware this movement exists and struggle with reaching their potential.

Many lifting injuries result from a lack of movement awareness and weakness of the posterior muscles. The hip hinge is a foundational movement for so many actions like deadlifts, squats, sprinting, jumping. Lacking an effective hip hinge is like racing a formula 1 car on flat tyres.

Developing a good hip hinge will improve the strength of the posterior chain. This includes muscles like the glutes, hamstrings and back extensors. The hinge movement is primarily coming from the hip. The goal is to maintain a neutral spine throughout the movement, the hips start to bend with your butt moving backwards and minimal flexion in the knee. This will increase the tension on the hamstrings and glutes.

The majority of people find this pattern of movement unnatural, as it’s rarely practiced and in most cases, are quad dominant. This quad dominant pattern causes weight to be distributed anteriorly, which is fine with some activities, but most actions we need to be more engaged with our posterior chain.

hip hinge movements.jpg

 

Below are a series of stretches and strengthening exercises to help Improve your hip hinging abilities.

Weighted Hip Hinge

This exercises is a great way to warm up and encourage the hip back movement while fighting the resistance to maintain a neutral spine.

Banded Hip Distractions

These two movements are also great for warming up. Both encourage release of the hamstrings but also the band provides a traction force on the hip socket. This should allow the joint to move free’er and help you access more range in the joint.

Dynamic Hamstring stretch

This is a deeper stretch of the hamstrings. Having more flexibility here will help you hinge better at the hip which will off load the knees.

Jefferson Curl

This movement is a great way of developing movement segmentally and will help build strength when maintaining a stable spine. It’s important to note if you have a spinal injury to avoid this movement until you have gone through the appropriate phases of rehab.

Continue reading “Hip Opener for Hinge Shapes”

Sleep Deprivation and Injury Risk

Acute and chronic sleep deprivation both have negative results with athletic performance. It also poses a greater chance of injury.

Optimal sleep can help minimise athletic injury

Skaggs 2014

For most of us sleep is not taken too seriously. We forgo sleep for other priorities in our busy lives. As I previously posted about the effects of sleep on exercise.  This study demonstrates that a lack of sleep increases the chance of injury. While this studied sleep deprivation of adolescents it can be easily applied to the wider population.

Deprived sleep will lead to higher perceptions of effort and fatigue, impaired strength, endurance and accuracy. Gym go’ers to aspiring athletes should look at this aspect of their life more seriously to protect themselves.

For optimal recovery we should prioritise sleep as much as we do with other remedies like recovery drinks, stretching, ice baths and foam rolling. Tapping into the right amount of sleep will improve performance and recovery from injury.

Original Abstract

Background: Much attention has been given to the relationship between various training factors and athletic injuries, but no study has examined the impact of sleep deprivation on injury rates in young athletes. Information about sleep practices was gathered as part of a study designed to correlate various training practices with the risk of injury in adolescent athletes.

Methods: Informed consent for participation in an online survey of training practices and a review of injury records was obtained from 160 student athletes at a combined middle/high school (grades 7 to 12) and from their parents. Online surveys were completed by 112 adolescent athletes (70% completion rate), including 54 male and 58 female athletes with a mean age of 15 years (SD=1.5; range, 12 to 18 y). The students’ responses were then correlated with data obtained from a retrospective review of injury records maintained by the school’s athletic department.

Results: Multivariate analysis showed that hours of sleep per night and the grade in school were the best independent predictors of injury. Athletes who slept on average <8 hours per night were 1.7 times (95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0; P=0.04) more likely to have had an injury compared with athletes who slept for ≥8 hours. For each additional grade in school, the athletes were 1.4 times more likely to have had an injury (95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.6; P<0.001).

Conclusion: Sleep deprivation and increasing grade in school appear to be associated with injuries in an adolescent athletic population. Encouraging young athletes to get optimal amounts of sleep may help protect them against athletic injuries.

Improving hang position

Part 3 of shoulder positions. This section provides some useful mobility exercises for improving the hang shape. This will help improve transitioning into a clean or snatch position.

Where we start can direct us to where we finish.

This is the third part of breaking down the 4 shoulder positions. With the goal of giving you mobilisation exercises and stretches to access the full range of these positions. Overall helping you perform better and more consistently, but also minimising the risk of injury.

We’ve got a great over head position and front rack now. So hows your clean or snatch? Even if you’ve cleaned up your movement over head and in the front rack you will struggle to find it without a good transition through the hang. The bar will deviate from a straight line and cause changes in load through the shoulders, making it much harder to get organised at the end point.

The hang shape challenges us most with internal rotation. Full internal rotation at the shoulder is rarely used and is often over compensated with an anterior tilt of the shoulder blade. A lot of patients that come in for treatment struggle with lifting their hand off their lower back, some are completely unable lift it off because of tightness in the shoulder.

Below are stretches that will help get the shoulder more flexible in a hang shape.


Internal Rotation stretch with rigging – Take the hand behind the back and hold the bar. Step away from the bar slowly until you feel the shoulder begin to stretch. Hold for 2 minutes. Then add a small squat to build the stretch. Hold for another 2 minutes. To wind it up even further do a little turn away from the shoulder. Hold for 2 minutes.

Lying down Barbell on shoulder – Lying down on your back, take the barbell and place the end of the barbell over the front of your shoulder, ease it down gently. With the elbow in line with your shoulder and elbow at 90 degrees, take the palm of your hand down towards the floor. Try to keep the shoulder on the floor. Repeat for 2 minutes.