Crossfit: Is it time to go Rx?

Are you at that point in your CrossFit training where you’re asking if it’s time to go Rx in a workout? Read on to make sure it’s safe and no risk of injury.

Have peace in the process and joy in the progress

For a seasoned athlete this question is almost a full gone conclusion in deciding to do the prescribed workout. But even then on any given day factors can play their part in deciding if they need to adjust the workout. For the newer athletes and the others that have just been plugging away and making progress on the scaled options, it can be tempting to move into the prescribed workouts.

What does “going Rx” really mean?

  • You can safely move with consistency even when under fatigue.
  • You understand the purpose of the workout and can complete it within or around the desired goal.
  • Your coach is confident with you doing the workout.

Safety and Consistency

It’s the main concern for anyone attempting to workout at a prescribed level for the first time. Developing your competency of individual skills in the strength phase of training is vitally important. But also being able to match it with consistency when doing multiple reps. It’s important to be honest with your ability.

Moving either your body or heavy weight inefficiently and inconsistently over multiple reps only increases the risk of injury. If it means you continue building strength with the scaled options, so be it. Most workouts will repeat 2-3 times per year, giving you another opportunity for the next one. 

Understand the purpose

Every time you walk into the gym and see the new workout on the board consider that there is a purpose to each one. Workouts are not just slapped together. The coach has programmed each workout to compliment the type of strength work you’re doing and the stage that you’re in, within the program.

Each individual workout is designed to expose your body to different metabolic demands. A workout designed to be a short 5-8 minutes is expectant for you to be able to train continuously during this time at a weight you can keep going. If you’re going Rx and taking long breaks, this defeats the object of the session.

The other side is doing a workout that’s meant to be long in duration testing stamina. If you’re scaling too low, this could get you through the workout much faster. While this looks good on the whiteboard you won’t get the intended aerobic demand to your body.

If you’re unsure about where your expected to finish or what weight would be appropriate….

Speak to the Coach

Coach has been watching you week by week and is aware of your abilities. They also understand the stimulus of each workout. So if you’re still unsure of what level you’re at, ask the coach. They’ll guide you on appropriate weight, pacing, expectation of finish time and offer scaling options if you’re injured or still not ready for a particular movement.

If the coaches decision is lower than your expectation, leave the ego at the door. This is for your own safety and you’ll still end up getting an effective workout.

Gradually you’ll find there’ll be days you can Rx and others you won’t. Remember that you can’t force the process. Keep working to your ability and progress will come.

Author: Graeme Lawson

With more than 13 years working both in the UK and New Zealand, Graeme offers a vast amount of experience and knowledge when treating musculoskeletal conditions. Being part of various clubs on the grass roots level to international with the England Volleyball team he has developed a broad skill set. His patient’s see exceptional results from a progressive blend of hands on manual therapy, education and exercise prescription. Catering from the home and work related injuries to athletes from novice to elite levels. Graeme’s outlook is the same with all who visit, that prevention is better than the cure. While providing a variety of hands-on treatments, he knows how important it is to offer education, preventative advice and tailored exercises to continue long after you have been discharged, helping avoid injuries in the future. For pastimes he has played basketball over the last couple of decades at different national levels. Graeme has also been doing CrossFit for 6 years. Having both the knowledge and ability of these technical movements provides athletes confidence with the advice they receive.

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