Study: Resistance training on neck pain

This study found positive results with strengthening exercises to reduce muscle tension and pain with office workers suffering with neck pain.

Lindegaard 2013

Working in the office you’re bound to suffer with neck pain at some stage. If poorly managed this can progressively become chronic. Not only can this impact your function, but interferes with your levels of concentration and performance at work. This then feeds into your mood and becomes a negative loop which is then difficult to break.

When treating a patient with chronic neck pain there’s a range of manual techniques that have strong evidence to support them. But in addition to hands-on therapy, exercises are provided to assist in the recovery. These could be in the form of stretches, postural setting or strengthening.

This study focused on strengthening exercises using a resistance band  (Theraband). Over a 10 week period they performed lateral raises with the resistance band once per day to the point of fatigue or up to 2 minutes. They found at the end of the 10 weeks through EMG testing the neck muscles were more relaxed and had reduced pain levels.

Original Abstract

Background: This study investigates the acute and longitudinal effects of resistance training on occupational muscle activity in office workers with chronic pain.

Methods: 30 female office workers with chronic neck and shoulder pain participated for 10 weeks in high-intensity elastic resistance training for 2 minutes per day (n = 15) or in control receiving weekly email-based information on general health (n = 15). Electromyography (EMG) from the splenius and upper trapezius was recorded during a normal workday.

Results: Adherence to training and control interventions were 86% and 89%, respectively. Comparedh with control, training increased isometric muscle strength 6% (P < 0.05) and decreased neck/shoulder pain intensity by 40% (P < 0.01). The frequency of periods with complete motor unit relaxation (EMG gaps) decreased acutely in the hours after training. By contrast, at 10-week follow-up, training increased average duration of EMG gaps by 71%, EMG gap frequency by 296% and percentage time below 0.5%, and 1.0% EMGmax by 578% and 242%, respectively, during the workday in m. splenius.

Conclusion: While resistance training acutely generates a more tense muscle activity pattern, the longitudinal changes are beneficial in terms of longer and more frequent periods of complete muscular relaxation and reduced pain.

Lidegaard M, et al. Effect of brief daily resistance training on occupational neck/shoulder muscle activity in office workers with chronic pain: randomized controlled trial. Biomed Res Int. 2013.

Author: Graeme Lawson

With more than 13 years working both in the UK and New Zealand, Graeme offers a vast amount of experience and knowledge when treating musculoskeletal conditions. Being part of various clubs on the grass roots level to international with the England Volleyball team he has developed a broad skill set. His patient’s see exceptional results from a progressive blend of hands on manual therapy, education and exercise prescription. Catering from the home and work related injuries to athletes from novice to elite levels. Graeme’s outlook is the same with all who visit, that prevention is better than the cure. While providing a variety of hands-on treatments, he knows how important it is to offer education, preventative advice and tailored exercises to continue long after you have been discharged, helping avoid injuries in the future. For pastimes he has played basketball over the last couple of decades at different national levels. Graeme has also been doing CrossFit for 6 years. Having both the knowledge and ability of these technical movements provides athletes confidence with the advice they receive.

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